Contents
Cal Poly Pomona

P&R Responses for recommendation 22

Recommendation 22
Department Accounting
Consensus Opinion 9 out of 10 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation Successful use of the computer and the understanding of information systems is critical to any business professional. The computer is a tool that we use to solve business problems more quickly, efficiently, and with more data. The information system details how data flows through the system to produce reports, and control and effect decision making. The Computer Information Systems (CIS) option is foundational to how our students learn to solve business problems with the computer. Moving the Computer Information Systems option out of the College of Business would pose a serious loss to all business students, and in particular, the Accounting students. Accounting students need more CIS courses, not less. Much of what we do in the Accounting classroom assumes a basic knowledge of computer expertise. We rely on the CIS department to provide students with fundamental skills and they are encouraged to pursue more advanced courses. Fields such as IT Audit demand a synergistic blend of Accounting and CIS skills. If the Computer Information Systems option were to be merged with Computer Science, would our students then go outside their College to learn the information technology skills that they need? Would our focus as a College shift away from IT issues? The direction of study of IT issues differs as put forth by the College of Business Administration and the College of Science. The removal of the Computer Information Systems option would not strengthen the education that our students receive in the College of Business—it would weaken it. It would change also the culture and environment of the College of Business. As such we strongly oppose this proposal.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 22
Department Accounting
Consensus Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Consensus Explanation Successful use of the computer is critical to any business professional. The computer is a tool that we use to solve business problems more quickly, efficiently, and with more data. The Computer Information Systems option is a critical part of how our students learn to solve business problems with the computer. Moving the Computer Information Systems option out of the College of Business would pose a serious loss to the Accounting students. Accounting students need more CIS courses, not less. Much of what we do in the Accounting classroom assumes a basic knowledge of computer expertise. We rely on the CIS department to provide students with fundamental skills and they are encouraged to pursue more advanced courses. Fields such as IT Audit demand a blending of Accounting and CIS skills. If the Computer Information Systems option were to be merged with Computer Science, would our students then go outside their College to learn the computer skills that they need? Would our focus as a College shift away from IT issues? The removal of the Computer Information Systems option would not strengthen the education that our students receive in the College of Business—it would weaken it and we strongly oppose it.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 22
Department CIS
Consensus Opinion 15 out of 15 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation Potential Synergies from Merging Computing Disciplines

Merging CIS with Other Digital Computing Disciplines (CS and ECET/ET) provides few synergies.
Merging these disciplines because they use computer technology is like merging Accounting, Finance, and Physics because they use mathematics.

CIS Curriculum: emphasizes development of business information systems and the use of technology within/across organizations.
• ECET/ET offers circuit analysis and computer hardware courses.
• CS features scientific programming of algorithms, numerical methods, and operating systems.
• Very few courses in the CIS, CS and ECET/ET curricula are similar.
• CIS students lack mathematical skills for CS courses.
• CS and ECET/ET students lack business background for CIS courses.

Students: The career focus of these disciplines differs.
• CS and ECET/ET graduates become technical staff at engineering firms.
• CIS graduates, with business and technical knowledge, join organizational IT departments and consulting firms.

CIS Student Survey (2007)
• 91% of 217 CIS students surveyed preferred a program integrating business and technology courses.
• 76% opposed a merger with other computing programs and 64% wouldn’t choose a CIS major with fewer business and more math/science courses.
• 76% opposed relocating CIS away from the CBA and 50% wouldn’t choose a CIS major if the program was moved to another college.
• Conclusion: merging CIS with other computing disciplines and/or moving CIS out of CBA would reduce student enrollment in CIS.

Academic Accreditation differs:
• AACSB accreditation of CIS requires qualified faculty with Ph.Ds. in CIS-related disciplines who publish. CIS has the highest proportion of academically-qualified faculty in the CBA.
• CIS does not qualify for CS and ECET/ET’s ABET accreditation.

Redundancy Reduction/Resource Savings do not exist
• Three CIS/CS/ECET/ET courses that appear similar have considerably different content and prerequisites.
• CIS uses specialized computing/teaching labs-- computer forensics, multimedia web development, and project management applications--unavailable in Engineering and Science labs.

CIS requests Recalculation of QUALITY Outcomes
• all quality indicators including AACSB substantiate high quality.
• CIS measures student success via integrative, capstone projects, in which student teams solve technological problems for a customer--process is used for program review and improvement.
o Success requires technological and “soft” skills that employers value: documentation, oral presentations, customer relationship management, and project coordination.
o Senior project report archives and videos of final presentations demonstrate student success.
• 2005: Because of CIS, Cal Poly Pomona awarded Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by NSA and DHS (only Southern California university).

Cyclical enrollment pattern doesn’t measure quality or growth potential:
• CIS enrollment is cyclical.
• Market for technology jobs growing--employers cannot find enough CIS graduates.
• CIS enrollment nationwide lags three years behind market trends.

“Minimal evidence of participation in campus initiatives”:
• CIS faculty are active in campus service-learning, accessibility, I&IT distance learning, and cyber-security initiatives.
• CIS senior projects have provided service-learning projects for 20 years, including service to over 90 community organizations in the past 5 years.
• Other classes provide service projects that integrate technology into local school districts.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 22
Department Computer Information Systems
Consensus Opinion 15 out of 15 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation CIS Department Response to P&R Recommendations:

Potential Synergies from Merging Computing Disciplines

Merging CIS with Other Digital Computing Disciplines (CS and ECET/ET) provides few synergies.
Merging these disciplines because they use computer technology is like merging Accounting, Finance, and Physics because they use mathematics.

CIS Curriculum: emphasizes development of business information systems and the use of technology within/across organizations.
• ECET/ET offers circuit analysis and computer hardware courses.
• CS features scientific programming of algorithms, numerical methods, and operating systems.
• Very few courses in the CIS, CS and ECET/ET curricula are similar.
• CIS students lack mathematical skills for CS courses.
• CS and ECET/ET students lack business background for CIS courses.

Students: The career focus of these disciplines differs.
• CS and ECET/ET graduates become technical staff at engineering firms.
• CIS graduates, with business and technical knowledge, join organizational IT departments and consulting firms.

CIS Student Survey (2007)
• 91% of 217 CIS students surveyed preferred a program integrating business and technology courses.
• 76% opposed a merger with other computing programs and 64% wouldn’t choose a CIS major with fewer business and more math/science courses.
• 76% opposed relocating CIS away from the CBA and 50% wouldn’t choose a CIS major if the program was moved to another college.
• Conclusion: merging CIS with other computing disciplines and/or moving CIS out of CBA would reduce student enrollment in CIS.

Academic Accreditation differs:
• AACSB accreditation of CIS requires qualified faculty with Ph.Ds. in CIS-related disciplines who publish. CIS has the highest proportion of academically-qualified faculty in the CBA.
• CIS does not qualify for CS and ECET/ET’s ABET accreditation.

Redundancy Reduction/Resource Savings do not exist
• Three CIS/CS/ECET/ET courses that appear similar have considerably different content and prerequisites.
• CIS uses specialized computing/teaching labs-- computer forensics, multimedia web development, and project management applications--unavailable in Engineering and Science labs.

CIS requests Recalculation of QUALITY Outcomes
• all quality indicators including AACSB substantiate high quality.
• CIS measures student success via integrative, capstone projects, in which student teams solve technological problems for a customer--process is used for program review and improvement.
o Success requires technological and “soft” skills that employers value: documentation, oral presentations, customer relationship management, and project coordination.
o Senior project report archives and videos of final presentations demonstrate student success.
• 2005: Because of CIS, Cal Poly Pomona awarded Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by NSA and DHS (only Southern California university).

Cyclical enrollment pattern doesn’t measure quality or growth potential:
• CIS enrollment is cyclical.
• Market for technology jobs growing--employers cannot find enough CIS graduates.
• CIS enrollment nationwide lags three years behind market trends.

“Minimal evidence of participation in campus initiatives”:
• CIS faculty are active in campus service-learning, accessibility, I&IT distance learning, and cyber-security initiatives.
• CIS senior projects have provided service-learning projects for 20 years, including service to over 90 community organizations in the past 5 years.
• Other classes provide service projects that integrate technology into local school districts.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 22
Department IBM
Consensus Opinion 14 out of 14 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation
The IBM department is very much opposed to this move. There are so many aspects of computer information systems that are critical to marketing and international business decision making that we really value the good lines of communication we get if we keep it in the college of business.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendations not submitted through the forms are available in this folder. They mainly consist of Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat documents. If none were submitted for this recommendation, the folder will be empty.