Contents
Cal Poly Pomona

P&R Responses for recommendation 84

Recommendation 84
Department Psychology and Sociology
Consensus Opinion 22 out of 23 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation Psychology and Sociology Department Response to the Prioritization and Recovery Committee Recommendations for the Sociology Program

We would like to thank the committee for their hard work and their feedback on our program. We would like to respond to a number of the issues raised in the report. Addressing growth is an issue we have actively undertaken by redesigning our Sociology curriculum to reflect a clear and exclusive sociology education for our students. We have enhanced our current one theory class offerings and one course methods requirement to two each. Last year we developed a new upper-division theory series for all of our majors; this year we are enhancing our methods curriculum to reflect the multiple approaches to doing research in sociology. In addition, we are working on removing classes that are either redundant or no longer in step with sociology as a discipline. We will also be introducing other courses we feel are emerging as critical to a strong foundation in sociology. Our improved curriculum offerings will help our sociology students have a stronger foundation in sociology and at the same time deter those students who do not have a strong interest in the discipline.

To further limit growth, we have stopped accepting late applications for the major and we do not accept students who are not in good standing. However, some students who transfer over from other colleges with at-risk status (2.0-2.2) are in need of support and guidance. Consequently, we have designated at-risk faculty advisors in our department. Still, we have a higher than average percentage of students at risk and a high major-to-faculty ratio. Hence, more tenure track faculty are needed to increase the proportion of FTES taught by tenured and tenure-track faculty and to reduce the major-to-faculty ratio--allowing more effective follow-up in the advising of at-risk students while at the same time acknowledging the need to manage enrollment.

Our program supports a diverse student body, and due to the high demand for advising and the limited number of faculty advisors our program is often stressed to find enough time to adequately guide our students in need. After meeting with consultants last year we redeveloped our outcomes assessment plan and are in the process of implementing it.

The review of our program is dated and therefore we understand why our efforts in generating funds are not included. In reality, we have been very successful in generating external grants. Four of our colleagues have successfully written grant proposals, which have allowed them to pursue research and include our students in the research projects. Our faculty have been very active in working with Lisa Nashua from development and Leticia McCart, a grant consultant, to develop and write grant proposals which have resulted in successful awards.

Given the success of the sociology program within tight budgetary constraints, and our goal to better serve our students, we request that the Committee reconsider its recommendation and support increased funding for the Sociology program at this time.

Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

There were no votes against the departmental response to the recommendation. One faculty member chose to abstain during the vote. Thus, there is no minority opinion from our department.

Recommendation 84
Department Psychology and Sociology
Consensus Opinion 22 out of 23 faculty/staff : Pro
Consensus Explanation Psychology and Sociology Department Response to the Prioritization and Recovery Committee Recommendations for the Sociology Program

We would like to thank the committee for their hard work and their feedback on our program. We would like to respond to a number of the issues raised in the report. Addressing growth is an issue we have actively undertaken by redesigning our Sociology curriculum to reflect a clear and exclusive sociology education for our students. We have enhanced our current one theory class offerings and one course methods requirement to two each. Last year we developed a new upper-division theory series for all of our majors; this year we are enhancing our methods curriculum to reflect the multiple approaches to doing research in sociology. In addition, we are working on removing classes that are either redundant or no longer in step with sociology as a discipline. We will also be introducing other courses we feel are emerging as critical to a strong foundation in sociology. Our improved curriculum offerings will help our sociology students have a stronger foundation in sociology and at the same time deter those students who do not have a strong interest in the discipline.

To further limit growth, we have stopped accepting late applications for the major and we do not accept students who are not in good standing. However, some students who transfer over from other colleges with at-risk status (2.0-2.2) are in need of support and guidance. Consequently, we have designated at-risk faculty advisors in our department. Still, we have a higher than average percentage of students at risk and a high major-to-faculty ratio. Hence, more tenure track faculty are needed to increase the proportion of FTES taught by tenured and tenure-track faculty and to reduce the major-to-faculty ratio--allowing more effective follow-up in the advising of at-risk students while at the same time acknowledging the need to manage enrollment.

Our program supports a diverse student body, and due to the high demand for advising and the limited number of faculty advisors our program is often stressed to find enough time to adequately guide our students in need. After meeting with consultants last year we redeveloped our outcomes assessment plan and are in the process of implementing it.

The review of our program is dated and therefore we understand why our efforts in generating funds are not included. In reality, we have been very successful in generating external grants. Four of our colleagues have successfully written grant proposals, which have allowed them to pursue research and include our students in the research projects. Our faculty have been very active in working with Lisa Nashua from development and Leticia McCart, a grant consultant, to develop and write grant proposals which have resulted in successful awards.

Given the success of the sociology program within tight budgetary constraints, and our goal to better serve our students, we request that the Committee reconsider its recommendation and support increased funding for the Sociology program at this time.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation
There were no "con" votes regarding the departmental response to the recommendation. One faculty member chose to abstain during the vote. Thus, there is no minority opinion from our department.

Recommendations not submitted through the forms are available in this folder. They mainly consist of Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat documents. If none were submitted for this recommendation, the folder will be empty.