Contents
Cal Poly Pomona

P&R Responses for recommendation 96

Recommendation 96
Department C
Consensus Opinion 11 out of 12 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation he Computer Science Department strongly agrees with the response of the Geological Science Department for its Geology program. Our department supports the Geology program and truly believes that Geological Sciences is a hard science like Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics and Computer Science and doesn’t belong in Environmental Sciences. As indicated in their response, the Geology program is growing both in terms of majors and faculty, thus indicating that it is a healthy program. Given the nature of our geographical location and important contributions of geologists, it would be unfair to group the Geology program with Environmental Sciences. We support the Geological Sciences Department’s request to stay as an independent science department in College of Science and not be merged with un-related design and studio based disciplines in the Environmental Science Division as proposed by the P&R recommendations.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 96
Department Chemistry
Consensus Opinion 25 out of 25 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation The Faculty of the Chemistry Department unanimously agree that the current P&R process lacks sufficient justification, is based upon faulty or incomplete data, promotes a highly personal administrative agenda, and summarily disregards the university community's duty of shared governance


The Geological Sciences Faculty unanimously opposes the P&R recommendation to merge the Geology Program under a new Environmental Science Division. Geology is one of the cornerstones of the Natural Sciences and intrinsically linked to Physics, Chemistry, and Biology through shared methodology and pedagogy in the scientific study of the Earth. While we would welcome opportunities for collaboration through an inter-departmental Center of Environmental Studies, the integrity of the Geology Program and its science-based curriculum must be preserved. Removing Geology from the Natural Sciences and merging it with design or policy oriented disciplines would undermine our credibility, devalue our degree and degrade our ability to attract and retain quality students, faculty and external funding. The recommended merger would likely hinder existing collaborations with the other Natural Sciences and Engineering. Given the local importance of seismic and landslide hazards, a comprehensive polytechnic university in Southern California needs an independent and vital Geology Program.

By all indications, the Department is strong and growing. In the last 2 years, the number of Geology majors has increased by 35%. While relatively small, it is not atypical for a CSU geology department and was lauded in the P&R report for its efficiency.

The Department has hired new research-active faculty. In the last 2 years, our external funding productivity has increased substantially, with grants and consulting contracts in hazard reduction, mining and solid Earth research: non-environment related growth areas. We recently were recognized as members of the Southern California Earthquake Center, which will provide new opportunities for internships and external funding.

Our Department is expanding collaboration with the other Natural Sciences and Engineering through new classes in Engineering Geology, Global Geophysics and Geo-Mathematics, which can only be hindered by removing Geology from the Natural Sciences. Engineering Geology was praised in the College of Science Commentary on Prioritization Reports as a collaborative effort that prevented redundancies. We also play a key role in teacher training (a program of distinction in the Commentary), science education outreach, and are actively engaged in the Teacher Quality Enhancement and SEES NSF STEM Scholarship programs.

Our majors benefit from a rigorous geosciences curriculum that emphasizes field and laboratory skills and demands a strong foundation in physics, chemistry, and mathematics. They engage in faculty-mentored research, participate in the Keck Geology Consortium and NSF programs, and regularly present results at professional conferences. A notable percentage now pursues graduate degrees. The Geology Club was voted best student club this year by the Science Council. They collaborate with the Geotechnical Engineering Club and the Inland Empire Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists.

Our program is widely respected for producing graduates with exceptional applied knowledge and field experience. Geology alumni work in a broad range of professions addressing problems in natural hazards, geotechnical engineering, energy and mineral resources, hydrology, environmental remediation and Science education. Regardless of profession, they emphasize the competitive edge that a science-based Geology degree provides for career advancement.

A survey of CSU/UC and US campuses shows that Geology is nearly always housed within Natural or Physical Science divisions, never Environmental Science, reflecting the academic tradition of Geology as a core Natural Science discipline. The integrity of the Geology Program must be preserved in order to uphold the value of the education and degree we offer our students and for our faculty to remain competitive in Earth Science grant programs. Dilution of the program by merger would do a great disservice to our students, the university and our community.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 96
Department College of Science Curriculum Committee
Consensus Opinion 6 out of 6 faculty/staff : Pro
Consensus Explanation 96 Geology

The Geology program is integral part of the Science curriculum at Cal Poly. The geochemistry and mineralogy are strongly connected with Chemistry. The geophysics, recently strengthened by a new hire, connects with Physics and there is significant informal equipment exchanges between these departments. The computer modeling of geological processes is analogous to computer modeling courses in Physics, Math, and Computer Science. Even the study of fossils leans on Biology to some degree. The Geology Technician does most of the machining for the entire College of Science. There is much synergism by having Geology in the College of Science.

Urban Planning and other environmental programs have limited serious Physics or Chemistry components, and the merger would leave Geology largely unsupported. This would significantly weaken the Program. The Cal Poly Geology Department, despite its small size, is the lowest cost Geology Department (per FTE) in the CSU. Its relevance to the community is supported by one of the highest donation rates by its alumni. While other CSU campuses in Southern California are rapidly adding resources to their Geology programs because of the water, earthquake, and other geology problems, it is strange that this campus wishes to withdraw resources from the program.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 96
Department GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Consensus Opinion 10 out of 12 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation The Geological Sciences Faculty unanimously opposes the P&R recommendation to merge the Geology Program under a new Environmental Science Division. Geology is one of the cornerstones of the Natural Sciences and intrinsically linked to Physics, Chemistry, and Biology through shared methodology and pedagogy in the scientific study of the Earth. While we would welcome opportunities for collaboration through an inter-departmental Center of Environmental Studies, the integrity of the Geology Program and its science-based curriculum must be preserved. Removing Geology from the Natural Sciences and merging it with design or policy oriented disciplines would undermine our credibility, devalue our degree and degrade our ability to attract and retain quality students, faculty and external funding. The recommended merger would likely hinder existing collaborations with the other Natural Sciences and Engineering. Given the local importance of seismic and landslide hazards, a comprehensive polytechnic university in S. California needs an independent and vital Geology Program.

By all indications, the Department is strong and growing. In the last 2 years, the number of Geology majors has increased by 35%. While relatively small, it is not atypical for a CSU geology department and was lauded in the P&R report for its efficiency.

The Department has hired new research-active faculty. In the last 2 years, our external funding productivity has increased substantially, with grants and consulting contracts in hazard reduction, mining and solid Earth research: non-environment related growth areas. We recently were recognized as members of the Southern California Earthquake Center, which will provide new opportunities for internships and external funding.

Our Department is expanding collaboration with the other Natural Sciences and Engineering through new classes in Engineering Geology, Global Geophysics and Geo-Mathematics, which can only be hindered by removing Geology from the Natural Sciences. Engineering Geology was praised in the College of Science Commentary on Prioritization Reports as a collaborative effort that prevented redundancies. We also play a key role in teacher training (a program of distinction in the Commentary), science education outreach, and are actively engaged in the Teacher Quality Enhancement and SEES NSF STEM Scholarship programs.

Our majors benefit from a rigorous geosciences curriculum that emphasizes field and laboratory skills and demands a strong foundation in physics, chemistry, and mathematics. They engage in faculty-mentored research, participate in the Keck Geology Consortium and NSF’s REU program, and regularly present results at professional conferences. A notable percentage now pursues graduate degrees. The Geology Club was voted best student club this year by the Science Council. They collaborate with the Geotechnical Engineering Club and the Inland Empire Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists.

Our program is widely respected for producing graduates with exceptional applied knowledge and field experience. Geology alumni work in a broad range of professions addressing problems in natural hazards, geotechnical engineering, energy and mineral resources, hydrology, environmental remediation and Science education. Regardless of profession, they emphasize the competitive edge that a science-based Geology degree provides for career advancement.

A survey of CSU/UC and US campuses shows that Geology is nearly always housed within Natural or Physical Science divisions, never Environmental Science, reflecting the academic tradition of Geology as a core Natural Science discipline. The integrity of the Geology Program must be preserved in order to uphold the value of the education and degree we offer our students and for our faculty to remain competitive in Earth Science grant programs. Dilution of the program by merger would do a great disservice to our students, the university and our community.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 96
Department Mathematics and Statistics
Consensus Opinion 32 out of 32 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation The Department of Mathematics & Statistics offers the following reasons for objecting to the recommendation to restructure both the departments and colleges on campus.

1. Splitting Kinesiology into three parts is unfair to the that Department. Those three aspects share much in common, far more than Kinesiology shares with Biology. The argument that Kinesiology and Biology share common resources is also specious. Biology and Botany share far more resources.
2. Botany and Geology share more of their coursework with the College of Science than they do with their proposed destinations. The opposite holds for Kinesiology.
3. The statements that certain programs on campus share certain themes, such as the environment or health, are superficial. Programs should not be grouped together based on loose linkages. The departments currently housed in the College of Science all share certain philosophies in their approach to teaching and research. As an administrative unit it makes sense to keep these together.
4. In all proposed restructurings the College of Agriculture has been eliminated. This would be a great loss to the university, not only as a legacy, but also as a continuing tradition on campus. One need only look at the campus itself to see this influence.
5. EVNR already has in place integrated core courses. Introducing new programs, not already a part of this integration, speaks to the forced nature of these groupings.
6. The associated departments listed in these moves have not voiced a desire to be moved. The inspiration for these changes is clearly external to the departments involved, which further suggests the artificial nature of these changes.
7. The goal to bring together disparate departments to tackle problems such as global warming is admirable, but a specialized division for doing this is unnecessary. For years the goal has been to push multidisciplinary collaboration, and being able to point to multiple colleges on campus as working together towards a solution paints the image of a unified university committed to communication and unity in purpose. Creating a separate division says much the opposite.
8. Increasing funding and attracting experienced and talented faculty will be hurt by moving Botany and Geology out of the College of Science. The message sent to the world is that at CPP we do not consider Botany or Geology a science.
9. The creation of additional divisions in large colleges does not reduce the proliferation of administrative layers. Although a fewer number of Deans may be needed, each division will need someone at the helm. This solution appears only to exacerbate the problem we are trying solve. Also, the money needed to re-label buildings, change letterheads, and other daily incidentals would create an additional financial burden on a campus already dealing with budget issues. A cost analysis should be completed.
10. P&R is being done before the environmental scan has been completed. As such, these decisions seem premature.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics finds the proposed restructuring to be arbitrary, inconsistent with the ideals of shared governance, and premature.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendation 96
Department Physics
Consensus Opinion 10 out of 10 faculty/staff : Con
Consensus Explanation Physics Department Response to
P&R Recommendation 96: Geology Program


The Physics Department faculty represented on the appended signature sheet oppose the P&R recommendation to merge the Geology Program under a new Environmental Science Division. We have had many collaborations and have shared resources with the Geology Department.

Geology best serves the university when it is located within the College of Science. This allows for easy sharing of equipment due to our physical proximity, and to close integration of our curriculum. There are true and deep synergies in the current arrangement that are likely to be disrupted by the proposed merger.

Especially in Southern California, an active Geology department is an essential program at a major university.
Minority Opinion NA out of NA faculty/staff : NA
Minority Explanation

Recommendations not submitted through the forms are available in this folder. They mainly consist of Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat documents. If none were submitted for this recommendation, the folder will be empty.